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TV Korner: Arrow 4.22-“Lost in the Flood”

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Despite claims to the contrary, “Lost in the Flood” is anything but lost.

Despite “Monument Point” hitting so hard, it’s “Lost in the Flood” that wins the race due to one very vital aspect.  Focus.  It’s multifaceted with three storylines going all at once, but it all remains dedicated to a common goal.  There’s pushback from the fallout of the destruction of Havenrock, but this time its delegation to the background is explained in a much better way.  The hacker battle is the emotional highlight thanks once again to the excellent Charlotte Ross.  This is the first time that Noah (guest star Tom Amandes) and Donna have come face to face since both of them were introduced in to the series, so there’s expectation for their meeting to illicit some sort of interaction.  There’s no disappointment in that regard, and I can‘t stress that enough.  This is a very well rounded look at how Felicity grew up and the parts that went in to making her who she is today.  This theme is further helped by the return of Seldon Cooper aka Brother Eye (guest star Nolan Gerard Funk) who’s contracted by Damien Darhk to act as his digital offensive line.  There’s complication between the parties of Noah, Felicity, and Donna relating to her association with the Green Arrow as well as a complex decision that Donna made when Felicity was seven, and it leads to some great character moments for both Donna and Felicity; but the external conflict remains the hacker battle of Noah and Felicity VS Cooper for control of Rubicon.  Most of this is done through exposition and overexplanation, but there’s tension that keeps the whole thing entertaining.  That, and the comic relief from Curtis (guest star Echo Kellum.)  Oh yeah, Curtis is back for this one, which is just good news all on its own.

Meanwhile, Oliver and Diggle have infiltrated the Ark in an effort to rescue Thea from HIVE and Malcolm Merlyn.  With no signal going out to Felicity, turns out they’re on their own.  Personally I was a fan of this direction.  The isolation made the interactions between Diggle and Oliver more personal, including a moment of doubt as Oliver sees the benefit of Darhk’s thinking.  It’s a very human side to see of Oliver as he’s encountered with the level of hope Darhk has instilled in to his flock (so to speak,) and how it causes him to second guess his methods for trying to help the city.  The truly striking part of the episode is the idyllic setting of the Ark juxtaposed with Oliver and Diggle’s nighttime attire.  The contrast between the two really speaks to the idea of the better life, and how’s Oliver’s battle gear really contrasts with the common people’s view of peace.  There are some bold direction choices and camera angles relating to the anarchy of Lonnie Machin’s intervention and his penchant for disrupting peace.  It all builds to a very dramatic conclusion that pushes the desperation of Damien Darhk over the edge in a brilliant way that Neal McDonough takes full command of.

Final Word: Not everything about the episode goes off flawlessly though.  The Thea mind control aspect is just a little too easily skirted around for example and the flashbacks have finally started to be significant, but only too late.  Those are small gripes though.  On the whole, the episode ends in a bittersweet way, that is fitting for the continued struggle of the Green Arrow.  It’s a powerful moment for Oliver as he finally sees the bigger picture of being a hero.  I frankly found this to be one of the best of the season, and I am ecstatic to see where these new revelations lead.

“Lost in the Flood” gets a 9.3/10.  It’s a great Arrow episode that takes advantage of characters and relationships to tell a revealing story about what it means to save people.    

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